Richard Hawkey


Rose Hawkey
September 19 at 2:43am

Richard Joseph Hawkey, 93, died peacefully at home on Saturday with his loving family around him.

After graduating from St. John’s University, Mr. Hawkey taught English at St. John’s Prep in Brooklyn. When he and Marion moved their growing family to North Massapequa, he began a distinguished career in the Levittown Public Schools, from which he retired in 1988. While at Levittown Memorial, he not only shared his passion for language and literature with thousands of students, he also advised the newspaper and served as department chairman. At the time of his death, he was still in touch with past students, many of whom are now retired themselves, and former colleagues, whom he mentored. After retiring from full time teaching, Mr. Hawkey continued to teach for another 15 years as an adjunct instructor at Hofstra University.

Richard is mourned by his children and their spouses: Mary and Tom Verdi, Regina and Jeffrey Vieira, Marian Hawkey, Richard and Maryanne Hawkey, John Hawkey, and Rosemary Hawkey. He leaves behind seven grandchildren: Ellie, Rina, Avi, Francis, Elsie, Grayce, and Adam; five great-grandchildren: Gia, Adigan, Jack, Isabella and Andre; and sisters-in-law Audrey and Ann. He is predeceased by his brother Robert and sister Eileen.

Calling hours will be at the Chapey and Sons Funeral Home, 20 Hicksville Road, Bethpage on Tuesday, September 20 from 2-4:30 and 7-9:30 p.m; a Mass of Christian Burial will be held at St. James Church, Hicksville Rd., Seaford at 10:15 a.m. on Wednesday, September 21. Memorial donations to the Wounded Warrior Project would be greatly appreciated.
 

Published in Newsday on Sept. 19, 2016

HAWKEY - Richard Joseph, 93, died peacefully at home on Saturday with his loving family around him. Mr. Hawkey was born in New York City in 1923, son of Richard Hawkey and Elsie McGinley, and was raised primarily in Valley Stream, where he attended Central High School. Active in drama and the newspaper, he also met his future wife, Marion Riordan, there. After working at the Daily News as a runner, Mr. Hawkey served his country in the U.S. Army in WW II, rising to Master Sergeant. He served in the European theater until 1946, returning with a desire to teach. After graduating from St. John's University, Mr. Hawkey taught English at St. John's Prep in Brooklyn. When he and Marion moved their growing family to North Massapequa, he began a distinguished career in the Levittown Public Schools, from which he retired in 1988. While at Levittown Memorial, he not only shared his passion for language and literature with thousands of students, he also advised the newspaper and served as department chairman. At the time of his death, he was still in touch with past students, many of whom are now retired themselves, and former colleagues, whom he mentored. After retiring from full time teaching, Mr. Hawkey continued to teach for another 15 years as an adjunct instructor at Hofstra University. In their nearly 64 years together, Richard and Marion shared many interests: going to the theater, especially Broadway, watching classic movies, and avidly following current events and politics. Mr. Hawkey was known for his dry wit, his dedication to education, and his devotion to his wife and family. Richard is mourned by his children and their spouses: Mary and Tom Verdi, Regina and Jeffrey Vieira, Marian Hawkey, Richard and Maryanne Hawkey, John Hawkey, and Rosemary Hawkey. He leaves behind seven grandchildren: Ellie, Rina, Avi, Francis, Elsie, Grayce, and Adam; five great-grandchildren: Gia, Adigan, Jack, Isabella and Andre; and sisters-in-law Audrey and Ann. He is predeceased by his brother Robert and sister Eileen. Calling hours will be at the Chapey and Sons Funeral Home, 20 Hicksville Road, Bethpage on Tuesday, September 20 from 2-4:30 and 7-9:30 p.m; a Mass of Christian Burial will be held at St. James Church, Hicksville Rd., Seaford at 10:15 a.m. on Wednesday, September 21. Memorial donations to the Wounded Warrior Project would be greatly appreciated.

Published in Newsday on Sept. 19, 2016